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20121227
20121227
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, advances in technology, a whole host of technologies, gave government officials the power to invade individual privacy in a whole host of new ways. new ways, mr. president, that the founding fathers never dreamed of, and all through those days the congress and the courts struggled to keep up. time and time again, congress and the courts were most successful when they returned to the fundamental principles of the fourth amendment. and it's striking, mr. president, if you look at a lot of the debates that we're having today about the internet and the presiding officer has had a great interest in this, we've talked often about it, certainly the founding fathers could never have envisioned tweeting and twitter and the internet and all of these extraordinary, you know, technologies, but what we have seen as technology has continued to bring us this treasure trove of information, all of these spectacular opportunities, the founding fathers never envisioned, we saw that time and time again, that congress and the courts were most successful when they returned to the fundamental principles o
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. an international tug-of-war. over wire hangers. next. >>> when sandy tore through the mid atlantic coast, more than 650,000 homes were damaged or destroyed by water, wind and flames. so what happens after you lose almost everything? michelle miller catches up with a woman from breezy point. >> reporter: you wanted to look and see. when we first met marie lopresti eight weeks ago, she was desperately searching for anything spared by the fire that burned her home to the ground. >> is that something there? >> reporter: the only thing she found in the rubble was a charred fragment of a wine and cheese plate. but she was happy to have it. >> thank you. thank you. i got go now. [ crying ] [ knocking ] >> reporter: we wanted to know what happened to lopresti. hi, marie! >> hello. >> reporter: we found her in brooklyn at a family home she used to rent out. it's a house now filled with gifts from family, frie
with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. neural speeds increasing to 4g lte. brain upgrading to a quad-core processor. predictive intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. >> harris: we are hearing from a police officer who survived the shooting that killed two volunteer firefighters. he says he never saw the gunman pull the trigger but he could clearly hear the gunshots. it all happened on christmas eve in upstate, new york. the shooter likely set that fire as a trap and just waited for first responders to arrive. here is how the off duty officer described the scene. >> i come around that corner seconds after the fire department gets there. in my assumption i don't have a sense of anything other than a round or something incident sckets my windshield and i heard multiple shots after that. at that point i determined someone is shooting. >> harris: manual oman. flying shrapnel wounded that officer is
of technological innovation. usd not want to see a lose that again. -- i do not want to see us lose that again. host: 1 more tweet, once capital gains are taxed at the same rate as income, investors will still invest -- will not change a thing. guest: that depends what the rates are. history shows that to be true time and time again. whether the democrats institute the cuts, or whether the republicans do it, you can see the results. some countries around the world that have left of center governments have massively simplify their tax code, put in flat tax rates. revenues have mushroomed. host: the next call comes from santa elena, texas. caller: can somehow every state verify the people from health care, medicare, medicaid to be sure the people qualify? i did not know if i am right or wrong -- if we give medicare and medicaid to people who just come from other nations, no matter where, and they qualify -- we have a problem with medicaid and medicare. can we do some the about it? -- something about it? we have a lot of intelligent people. with everybody working together, we can do something. ho
and 2002 when so many people left the building because of technology stocks. i go over this again because i can never say it too many times. means that no one sector, one segment of the economy should ever account for 20% of your portfolio. if you own five stocks, only one of them can be a tech stock, one a health care stock, one a financial, only one can be an energy and one an industrial and only one a food and beverage-maker. what if you're not sure? always err on the side of caution. if two stocks trade together, underlying companies succeed or fail based on the same factors, you're not diversefieldified, oil driller and oil producer, people think they are different, both part of the same sector, look, both techs whether we like it or not, not doing this to be arbitrary or capricious or make it more difficult to pick stocks. when you get too concentrated in one area the moment something happens to one of the two big stocks in that air yaw want to throw yourself off the bridge because the loss will be enormous. imagine if you owned too many industrials when the economy started to slow du
-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanket, throw it over top of them, and unless you walked right into them, you wouldn't know that they were there. >> reporter: so what was once firmly in the world of make-believe, could quickly become quite real. and the science is in the special fabric, so you don't need a power source or some instruction manual to make it work. theoretically, any soldier, even in the most remote location could quickly put it on and put it to work. chris lawrence, cnn, the pentagon. >>> this week, we're looking back at 2012's top stories. cnn's ali velshi and christine romans put together a review of the year's top ten business stories, and you're going to notice a pattern. with only a few exceptions, the year in politics heavily
made necessary by new technology. but congress has failed to do this. some court rulings have likewise fallen short of protecting the full scope -- the full spirit of the fourth amendment as it applies to our world of complex data sharing. courts have attempted in good faith to determine whether individuals have a reasonable expectation of privacy in different kinds of information that they might share to third parties, sometimes online. but the result of many of these rulings is a varied and unpredictable legal landscape in which many don't know and can't figure out whether they can rely on the fourth amendment to protect sensitive information that they routinely share with others for a limited business purpose. congress needs to act to preserve the fourth amendment's protections as they apply to everyday uses including routine use of the internet, use of credit cards, libraries and banks. absent such protections, individuals may in time grow weary of sharing information with third parties. i'm cognizant that this area of the law is complex. it's full of changes and full of instances
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10